Friday, April 16, 2021

Going Global with Firefighters Cancer Advocacy: F.A.C.E.S. 2.0

One year after the World Trade Center attacks of 9/11, I founded the NY Cancer Resource Alliance with my "GET CHECKED NOW!" campaign for the many people I personally knew who were not very proactive about checkups and health monitoring as far as cancers (and there were many).  In my journey with Cousin "Sal" Banchitta (ret FDNY) speaking in firehouses and FF groups about cancer,  my interest was always in finding and reaching more of them. Years of face to face meetings became web conferences- allowing a local initiative to go national rather quickly.

But it wasn't until I met Lt. Chris Conner, president and founder of F.A.C.E.S. (Firefighters Against Cancer & Exposures) that I found the next chapter of my benevolence work.  From Bedford Texas, Chris has been implementing his own version of rescue to firefighters in need (from Cancer) as a charitable fund. Chris was the first FF org to endorse my documentary film "The Fire Still Burns" and supported all of NYCRA's initiatives as far as public outreach, cancer research support, education and all the work that typical cancer orgs do- but targeted to firefighters.

By 2021, Covid changed the shape of fundraising, advocacy and education - forcing everyone to go virtual. This leveraged our cancer networking message (through social media) to connect with doctors and survivors from Italy, the UK, Greece, Russia, Japan, the Netherlands and Italy.

On 3/31, NYCRA kicked off the first Cancer PowerMeet through Zoom and it was a great success. Our first topic was about Occupational Cancers from the Fire Service combining a panel of presenters from the retired FF community + cancer experts.  F.A.C.E.S. was one of our supporters in this as one of the national FF groups that helped us get the word out.

This got the attention of the medical societies and the public service community both domestically and abroad!  Overnight, we racked up hundreds of hits and commenters from many languages. The same global audience for our international cancer publishing is now reading our stuff about firefighters cancer.

In a matter of days, we organically merged 2 platforms together to form F.A.C.E.S. 2.0. (with a new website, www.Facing-Together.org). This brand allowed us to kick off new Firefighter E-events and reach the entire community on a much wider scale.  NYCRA (as in New York) became I.C.R.A. (Integrative Cancer Resource Alliance) the same week- shifting us out of our local platform.  But Chris made thousands of new friends overnight, introduced all our cancer advocates, educators, clinicians and medical researchers plus our combined resources from all the cancer orgs who are all supportive of Firefighters Cancers.

As ALLIANCES go, finding synergy is never easy. But once you do, you can build magic!

Now the work begins!



WHAT IS F.A.C.E.S. ?

The desire to extend a helping hand to those in need is in all of us- especially when someone's health or physical well being is at risk. FIREFIGHTERS lead this spirit of responding to a call for rescue during times of crisis or disaster. BUT WHAT HAPPENS WHEN A RESPONDER NEEDS HELP?

Leading the global front of this helping hand means searching for all available RESOURCES. FACES bands together as a community to form a solid support resource system between all cancer organizations and firefighter support groups.

FIREFIGHTERS AGAINST CANCER & EXPOSURES ( F.A.C.E.S. ) is founded by Christopher Conner of Bedford, TX. As a first responder, Chris established a community of resources dedicated to helping firefighters who have been diagnosed with cancer. Originally established as a charitable foundation, the 2021 version of FACES aligns with the strength of all cancer orgs, cancer resources and first responder groups to collectively bring public support and aid to our heroes in all ways possible. Firefighters and their families dedicate their lives and lifestyles to save others; it is our turn to help them. Heroum Animas Salvas. Save the Lives of Heroes. 

Saturday, February 27, 2021

Occupational Toxic Exposures from Burn Pits vs. Illnesses from the Fire Service

A BURN PIT is a method of garbage disposal in military bases (identified in Iraq and Afghanistan) where all waste is burned in a large pit in open air using combustible agents such as diesel fuel.  All refuse is incinerated here- from medical and human waste to plastics and rubber to environmental hazards like styrofoam, ammunition petroleum products.  The end result of burning these items + the use of incendiary agents like diesel and jet fuel have resulted in airborne concentrations of black smoke within the immediate area that have been recognized to cause respiratory issues to those exposed.

By January 17, 2019, Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard introduced the Burn Pits Accountability Act (HR 663) to the House or Representatives - Armed Services & Veterans' Affairs Committees. This bill required the Department of Defense (DOD) and the military departments to evaluate whether each member of the Armed Forces has been (1) based or stationed where an open air burn pit was used to dispose of waste, or (2) exposed to toxic airborne chemicals. Members located where an open burn pit was used or exposed to toxic airborne chemicals must be enrolled in the Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry, unless the member elects not to enroll. [1]

The effects of Burn Pits are being compared to other known military health cases like the wide exposure to Agent Orange from Viet Nam- as well as the many cancer cases caused by disasters like 9/11.  According to Chisolm Chisolm & Kilpatrick, a prominent law firm representing veterans health issues, "...Unlike exposure to Agent Orange, VA does not consider any disabilities presumptively associated with exposure to burn pit smoke.  Therefore, post-9/11 veterans filing claims for service connection must obtain a medical opinion stating that their condition is at least as likely as not a result of their exposure to burn pit smoke.  VA adjudicates burn pit claims on a case-by-case basis in which the decision is based on the facts unique to each claim.  However, post-9/11 veterans exposed to burn pits do in fact suffer from disabilities entitled to presumptive service connection because they were exposed to an herbicide agent as defined by VA under 38 CFR § 3.307(a)(6).  Here, VA defines herbicide agent specifically as “2,4-D; 2,4,5-T and its contaminant TCDD; cacodylic acid, and picloram”.  TCDD is the unfortunate byproduct in the production of 2,4,5-T, one of the two herbicides in Agent Orange.  Nevertheless, it is also a byproduct of incomplete combustion of certain harmful substances such as those disposed of in the burn pits, as indicated above." [2]


VA has determined that the presumption of service connection based on exposure to an herbicide agent, which includes TCDD, is warranted for any conditions for which VA acknowledges a positive association between the condition and such exposure.  Furthermore, VA has already established this positive association as it relates to many conditions, including but not limited to, diabetes mellitus type 2, ischemic heart disease, and respiratory cancers.  As a result, post-9/11 veterans who were exposed to burn pits should be afforded the same presumptions as Vietnam veterans. 


Wife of Burn Pits Victim Builds Action Response Initiative
*NYCRA Exclusive Interview with Mrs. Rosie Torres of BurnPits360 - Edited by: Cheri Ambrose

My husband is Leroy Torres, Ret. Captain of the US Army (2nd Battalion, 402nd Army Field) who served 10 years in active service.  His latest tour was 1 year spent in Balad, Iraq (2007) as Deputy Support Operations where he was constantly exposed to the toxic emissions of Burn Pits. I recall him being quarantined for respiratory issues and when he came home, we ended up at the ER due to severe flu-like respiratory episodes.  These issues continue to escalate today, resulting in chronic physical after-effects that recently forced out of his job.

With a simple Google search for "soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan/dying", stories popped up immediately including stories like a wife whose husband had died from a glioblastoma. Reading story after story brought me to Dr. Miller's article about the US Army concealing cases of Constrictive Bronchiolitis- the very lung disease my husband ended up being diagnosed with.  His report also shows an (unnamed) auto-immune disease which prompted me to reach doctors familiar with 9/11- who only had best guesses for us.

Prior to connecting with John Feal, I remember pulling up the air sampling data from 9/11 online. And then compared the V-A published policy that highlighted the dioxins from a declassified air sampling from Balad (the biggest burn pit) and found that there's around 10 or 12 that are completely the same.  Studying further reports on the mortalities and illnesses again, found identical matches. 

DIRECT AND CONSTANT PLUME EXPOSURE:
I've heard soldiers describe it as 10 acres worth of a black plume of smoke that just hovered over the whole base all day & all night - where the burn pits were situated near or next to the housing quarters. There was no area that was untouched by this plume. There was soup on the air conditioners; inside their nose; gray matter and black stuff would come out every time they would shower. This horrible stench was everywhere throughout his entire stay. All the soldiers tolerated this because "we're here to work". Leroy slept with a sheet over his face as a habit to reduce inhaling the "black stuff" while he was sleeping. This went on for an entire year with him, but for other soldiers, exposure must have been more.

I started BurnPits360 with a unique set of initiatives; we use real-time data and our own independent registry (separate from the V-A’s registry) to develop policy and legislation that will help save lives. We have direct access to those people that are sick in every congressional district and we track mortality also. Our goal is to shut down every single one of them, but we also want to help our vets at home with resources and any support that they may need.


Local Advocacy Calling for Time Sensitive Action + The WarFighters Bill

Prominent names like John Feal (FealGood Foundation) and Jon Stewart (American entertainer & political commentator) have become formidable champions in the legislative arena of 9/11 responders and cancer victims. They have taken on the fight to redefine 'awareness' to call on congressional action to secure healthcare and compensation to those who gave everything in the line of duty during the rescue and clean up efforts at the 2001 disaster. 

In the fall of 2019, this dynamic duo has been recruited by Rosie Torres of BurnPits360.org - an advocacy foundation for veterans and families affected by the health effects of Burn Pits exposures. With other powerful supporters like New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, a new bipartisan legislative push is underway to ensure fast-acting health response and compensation to the tens of thousands suffering linked health issues from their military service and sacrifice for this country. 

"With many Americans, the usual first reaction when they see a veteran is to say, 'thank you for your service'. As much as I myself don't say that lightly, that phrase is just something we’re all programmed to saying.  We need to modify that to “…thank you for your service and your sacrifice- What can I do to help you? How can I repay you?”  In fact, we can go further by asking “How can I give back to you for what you gave to our country?”  - states John Feal. "I'm confident that we're going to get something done by the end of this year- we're targeting veteran's day! We'd like to see all the legislation passed... it's called the WARFIGHTERS BILL. This is something that a divided country can wrap their arms around where everybody is united together. I still believe our military is one of those sacred things that the American people will get behind."

* Stay tuned for feature article on BurnPits360.org and the congressional healing on March 23, 2021 about a proposal for Burn Pits Legislation.


NEWS UPDATE
Rubio, Gillibrand Introduce Landmark Burn Pits Legislation to Help Veterans

March 26, 2021 / Washington, D.C. — U.S. Senators Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) introduced the bipartisan and bicameral Presumptive Benefits for War Fighters Exposed to Burn Pits and Other Toxins Act. U.S. Representatives Raul Ruiz, M.D (D-CA) and Brian Fitzpatrick (R-PA) will introduce the legislation in the U.S. House of Representatives. This bill would provide presumptive U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs benefits to servicemembers who have deployed and have illnesses due to exposure to burn pits and other toxins. Approximately 3.5 million veterans have been exposed to burn pits that spewed toxic fumes and carcinogens into the air. “This legislation includes presumption and actually fixes this urgent and immoral issue. Anything else just delays and denies the treatment and benefits our warriors need,” said veterans advocate Jon Stewart.

Presumptive conditions include a wide range of cancers and respiratory illnesses, including: asthma, that was diagnosed after service, head cancer of any type, neck cancer of any type, respiratory cancer of any type, gastrointestinal cancer of any type, reproductive cancer of any type, lymphoma cancer of any type, lymphomatic cancer of any type, kidney cancer, brain cancer, melanoma, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, constrictive bronchiolitis or obliterative bronchiolitis, emphysema, granulomatous disease, interstitial lung disease, pleuritis, pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis.
 
The following organizations support the bill: Vietnam Veterans of America, Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, The American Legion, Burn Pits 360, Vote Vets, Military Veterans Advocacy, Stronghold Freedom Foundation, Dixon Center, Veterans for Common Sense, Sergeant Sullivan Circle, National Veterans Legal Services Program, Warriors Project, Grunt Style, Feal Good Foundation.


Learning from the 1975 NY Tel Exchange Fire: First Major Job-Related Toxic Exposure in Firefighting History

Over 45 years ago, the first responders' community including the remaining survivors of the 1975 NY Tel Exchange Fire recalls one of the most significant disasters in firefighting history next only to 9/11.  The many health impacts from this historical event, exposing all responders also resulted in countless safety references from its many occupational hazards as well as prevention protocols and protective innovations. 

The NY Cancer Resource Alliance (NYCRA) features Ret. FDNY Ff. Dan Noonan and his contribution & sacrifice to the City of New York.  After his tenure at the fire service, Mr. Noonan pursued a life-long national crusade in safety awareness and publishing educational projects including his report about the 1975 NY Telephone Exchange Fire.  

Mr. Noonan's career started in Ladder Company 3 on East 13th street where only two years into the fire service, he experienced one of the most historical and devastating fires in the history of NYC Fire Department. He has since been an advocate for the 699 firefighters who responded to the Telephone Company Fire. His countless presentations and published work continues to raise education, awareness and prevention for all emergency responders about occupational toxic exposures-- referencing the 1975 Fire as an historical marker for incendiary airborne toxicities and carcinogens.   (See complete article)

What is "SALTY"?   A Study of Toxins from Emergent Fire Zones (originally published 7/11/2019)

TOXICOLOGY 101: A THREAT TO FIREFIGHTERS HEALTH

"In the fire service, a seasoned firefighter earns the title "salty" after having enough (ash or smoke dust) contaminants land on their protective gear.  

As part of our evaluation of all occupational illnesses contracted by first responders, we enter the world of TOXICOLOGY- the branch of science focused on the effects and detection of poisons.  It is also the discipline overlapping chemistry, biology and pharmacology- studying the adverse effects of chemical substances on living organisms.  In pursuit of first responders’ safety as far as chemical effects on the body, we connected with Professor David Purser of the Hartford Environmental Research (UK), a renowned toxicology expert who conducted major reviews on fire-exposed carcinogens published worldwide. “9/11 was unusual in that a major environmental hazard resulted from the dust cloud released as and after the Towers collapsed,” says Prof. Purser.  “The dust inhaled by responders at the time, and afterwards working at the site, has resulted in serious ongoing and developing health conditions and to this day. 

For fires in general, there is also increasing evidence and concern regarding FF exposure to carcinogens, especially from soot contamination to skin and clothing following attendance at incidents and during training.” An abstract from Prof. Purser’s latest presentation – “ Toxins Including Effects of Fire Retardants, During Fires and Post-Fire Investigation Activities” indicates a remarkable breakdown of some of the major toxins and carcinogenic compounds that the average firefighter would be exposed to.

• ASPHYXIANT GASES: CO, HCN, CO2 , low oxygen

• IRRITANTS/ ACID GASES :  HCl, HBr, HF, COF2 , H3 PO4, SO2 , NOx

• ORGANIC IRRITANTS:  acrolein, formaldehyde, crotonaldehyde, phenol, styrene

• PARTICULATES: especially ultrafine particles + metals

These toxins are usually found within active fire zones- either inside the fire event itself or downwind plume in the form of residues and soot or lethal fragments activated at high temperatures or in airborne smoke.  These asphyxiant gases, irritants and particulates are the main causes of injury and death of fire victims exposed to high concentrations inside burning buildings.  

Asphyxiant gases cause collapse with loss of consciousness during a fire, leading to death if exposure continues.  Irritants and smoke particulates cause pain to the eyes and lungs, with breathing difficulties, which inhibit escape during a fire and can lead to lung inflammation and edema within a few hours of rescue, which can also be fatal.  Those surviving may make a good recovery or suffer long term neurological or cardio-respiratory health effects, depending on the severity of the exposure. Those most at risk from these effects at the fire scene are building occupants and emergency responders not protected by breathing apparatus. 

See complete article: "A REVIEW OF TOXIC COMPOUNDS FROM EMERGENT FIRE ZONES"- NYCRA NEWS





WITNESSING THE HISTORY OF OCCUPATIONAL TOXIC EXPOSURES
By Dr. Robert L. Bard, cancer diagnostic specialist (NYC)

I was an active medical personnel for the US Air Force in the early 70's, where I have witnessed firsthand the many service-related tolls and physiological abuses that our troops have undergone health-wise.  I have scanned countless patients for health conditions linked to incendiary (toxic) exposures.  Many of these same conditions continued to plague them years after their tours of duty. 

On the domestic front, our medical community found startling parallels between those medical illnesses from toxic exposures to our first responders (firefighters).  This time, exposures from historical disasters like the 1975 NY Tel Fire and 9/11 e
armarked a history of health disorders "from the job" linked to exposure to burning complex compounds at high temperatures. A significant number of these individuals who spent enough time in "the danger zone" have contracted varying rates of cancer, calling for immediate diagnostic and treatment- years after the exposure.  This spike in cases can only come from ‘dormant’ cells or recurrence (usually with a vengeance) – such as cases of cancer tumors in the lung, liver, prostate, kidney, brain, skin and even the eye. To troubleshoot each case, it would be advantageous to take a crash course in toxicology and to recognize the chemical compounds that literally BATHED all responders during the event.  Understanding these chemicals can help us pursue their behaviors (on the body) and their long and short term effects.

By mid-2016, a curiously similar stream of disorders appeared in growing numbers, potentially related to toxic exposures from airborne incendiary substances- all from post-military personnel. Cases included neurological issues (nerve damage), cardiovascular disorders, skin lesions and liver & kidney problems - to name a few. News reports appeared to link these cases with military burn pits (and other fire related exposures) where prolonged exposure to burning plastics, lubricants, petroleum-based products and other refuse material were the likely culprit.

1) Congress.gov;  https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/663?q=%7B%22search%22%3A%5B%22CASE+Act%22%5D%7D&s=1&r=88

2) CCK Burn Pits & VA Disability- Veterans Law- "Agent Orange and Burn Pits" https://cck-law.com/blog/burn-pits-the-agent-orange-for-post-9-11-veterans/


Disclaimer & Copyright Notice: Copyright (c) 2021, IntermediaWorx inc. All Rights Reserved.  Additional copyrights shared by: The AngioFoundation (501c3) and the publishers of Prevention101.org  & The NY Cancer Resource Alliance [NYCRAlliance.org].  Contents in this article are provided publicly for informational purposes within non-commercial use and not for purposes of resale, distribution, commercial display or performance. Unless otherwise indicated on this web based page, no reproduction of any or all materials of this page is allowed without express/written permission from the publishers.  Additional permission may be required from third-parties who have provided limited permission for our publishers to use their content, whereas licenses for some of this Content may contain additional terms. When such Content licenses contain additional terms, we will make these terms available to you on those pages (which his incorporated herein by reference).The publishers/producers of this site and its contents such as videos, graphics, text, and other materials published are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. For any questions you may have regarding a medical condition, please always seek the advice of your physician or a qualified health provider. Do not postpone or disregard any professional medical advice over something you may have seen or read on this website. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 9-1-1 immediately.  This website does not support, endorse or recommend any specific products, tests, physicians, procedures, treatment opinions or other information that may be mentioned on this site. Referencing any content or information seen or published in this website or shared by other visitors of this website is solely at your own risk. The publishers/producers of this Internet web site reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to modify, disable access to, or discontinue, temporarily or permanently, all or any part of this Internet web site or any information contained thereon without liability or notice to you.

Tuesday, October 20, 2020

EFFECTS OF TOXIC EXPOSURES ARE CUMULATIVE - ESPECIALLY WITH FIREFIGHTERS

From an interview with (RET) FDNY Chief Anthony Bruno

Chief Anthony Bruno, decorated career firefighter with the FDNY (1962-1989) achieved top ranks of leadership as Captain of ladder 12 on 17th Street in Manhattan in the late 70's then Chief in Bushwick, several years later.  Celebrating his official retirement from the department in 1989, Chief Bruno found himself suiting up again, this time as a volunteer in the 9/11 WTC disaster of 2001.  He and the thousands of first responders raced to southern Manhattan to help all survivors, only to be exposed to some of the most lethal neurotoxins and carcinogenic compounds expelled by the incinerated building materials where The World Trade Center towers once stood.

Throughout his career, Chief Bruno took the initiative to research and investigate the health effects of carbon monoxide exposures to first responders. Standardized blood samples showed reports of lethal levels of carbon monoxide in the system three or four hours after the event. Because of this, he implemented the use of advanced testing devices (c/o the NY EPA) to check for CO levels in the exhaled breath- with 97% accuracy. Chief Bruno saw the value in this testing protocol as he proposed a department-wide screening program to identify those suffering from too much exposure.

"Doctors (at the time) posed the misconception that carbon monoxide did not have a cumulative effect. The average resident in a house fire may not usually get affected this way, but firefighters on regular duty can often be exposed frequently throughout a single night. This frequency in exposure holds somewhat of a half-life theory, similar to radiation as far as toxins staying in the bloodstream. The build-up from elevated levels continue to rise after further exposures. 

SURVIVING THE FIRE SERVICE & THE "NEW KILLER SMOKE"

During active duty, Chief Bruno claimed to directly know (and work with) firefighters who died from frequent exposures -- having gone to three or four fires each shift while never getting tested for carbon monoxide. "From what we now know, early detection and regular exposure testing could have prevented a lot of occupational injuries. Learning from history is also why the firefighter is much more protected these days. Today's use of masks is much more universal and mandatory, unlike the old days where firefighters hardly used them. Technology evolved and eventually so did we... but sometimes a little bit too late."

Referencing historical fires in NYC with recorded health effects to the responders, Chief Bruno noted landmark disasters including the 1975 NY Tel Fire and the 699 firefighters who were all exposed to the most lethal black smoke from burning PVC's and hazardous plastics. He also shared his own experience as the covering captain in 1979 at the fire in St. Batholomeow's Church (several blocks from St. Patrick's Cathedral) where he recognized great similarities to both incidents - including the deadly effects of burning pool & gardening chemicals and PVC's from the church.  Responders of both fires (within the same era) identified "a new type of fire"- incinerating high levels of carcinogens resulting in latent mortality cases.



The Diagnosis and Treatment of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning:
Excerpt from source: NCBI/NIH


The symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are usually non-specific. In patients with unclear neurological symptoms and possible exposure, carbon monoxide should be urgently considered as a differential diagnosis.

The treatment aims in particular to prevent long-term harms, such as cortical dysfunction, Parkinson‘s syndrome, Parkinson‘s disease, dementia, cardiac complications, as well as reduce mortality in the long term. All patients with symptomatic carbon monoxide poisoning should be treated with 100% oxygen as soon as possible. In severe cases of fire fume intoxication, combined poisoning with CO and cyanides should be considered. The evidence for the benefit advantage of hyperbaric oxygen is weak in view of the heterogeneity of the available studies. The decision in favor of HBOT seems sensible in severe CO intoxication or in pregnant women.

Assessment of hyperbaric oxygen therapy versus normobaric oxygen therapy
According to a report from the NIH, the intracellular and extracellular effects of carbon monoxide poisoning affect in particular the organs without oxygen reserves (heart, brain). Toxicologically, the quickest possible elimination of the poison is the most sensible way to prevent further injury. The higher the partial pressure of oxygen provided, the shorter the elimination period—which would in theory support hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). In practice, however, HBOT is the subject of controversial discussion (20, 21). Critics point out the great logistical challenges and lacking evidence. In actual fact, the heterogeneity of the studies to date (in terms of study design, kind of exposure, severity of intoxication, delay in treatment, treatment pressures applied, and follow-up period) barely allows for any evidence-based recommendation regarding the type and extent of HBOT (25). What adds to the dilemma is the fact that the HBOT therapy schemes applied vary widely across Europe (e57), which imposes limitations on future meta-analyses and their validity too. (See complete report on NIH)


20. Wolf SJ, Maloney GE, Shih RD, Shy BD, Brown MD. Clinical policy: critical issues in the evaluation and management of adult patients presenting to the emergency department with acute carbon monoxide poisoning. Ann Emerg Med. 2017;69:98–107. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
21. Buckley NA, Juurlink DN, Isbister G, Bennett MH, Lavonas EJ. Hyperbaric oxygen for carbon monoxide poisoning. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011;4 CD002041. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
22. Mintegi S, Clerigue N, Tipo V, et al. Pediatric cyanide poisoning by fire smoke inhalation: a European expert consensus. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2013;29:1234–1240. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
25. Hampson NB, Piantadosi CA, Thom SR, Weaver LK. Practice recommendations in the diagnosis, management, and prevention of carbon monoxide poisoning. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2012;186:1095–1101. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]




TOXICOLOGY 101: A THREAT TO FIREFIGHTERS HEALTH
As part of our evaluation of all occupational illnesses contracted by first responders, we enter the world of TOXICOLOGY- the branch of science focused on the effects and detection of poisons.  It is also the discipline overlapping chemistry, biology and pharmacology- studying the adverse effects of chemical substances on living organisms.  In pursuit of first responders’ safety as far as chemical effects on the body, we connected with Professor David Purser of the Hartford Environmental Research (UK), a renowned toxicology expert who conducted major reviews on fire-exposed carcinogens published worldwide. “9/11 was unusual in that a major environmental hazard resulted from the dust cloud released as and after the Towers collapsed,” says Prof. Purser.  “The dust inhaled by responders at the time, and afterwards working at the site, has resulted in serious ongoing and developing health conditions and to this day.  For fires in general, there is also increasing evidence and concern regarding FF exposure to carcinogens, especially from soot contamination to skin and clothing following attendance at incidents and during training.” An abstract from Prof. Purser’s latest presentation – “ Toxins Including Effects of Fire Retardants, During Fires and Post-Fire Investigation Activities” indicates a remarkable breakdown of some of the major toxins and carcinogenic compounds that the average firefighter would be exposed to. (See complete article)

"THE TELLTALE COUGH"- EXPLAINED
According to Dr. Paul Schulster, (pulmonologist from Oceanside, NY) the COUGH can say a lot, but often misleads the patient as a "nothing" or a "simple little cough".  For firefighters, it is usually a telltale sign of various possible issues. The first syndrome often comes from a post-nasal drip. The second most common cause is from irritation, inflammation and bronchiospasm. Third is Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. My 9/11-related patients that have GERD starts with that warning cough while others' coughs can trigger the asthma.  Finally, Irritative Cough Syndrome can also happen where one cough leads to another cough, irritating the airway, exacerbating another cough - and then another.

Having a cough here or a wheeze there is not enough for most first responders to raise the flag of alarm. Seasoned specialists like Dr. Schulster recognizes that unique and unusual symptoms or maladies do not reach the patient's consciousness for quite some time.  Ignoring or not paying more attention to these "little" anomalies tend to often be the norm.  These coughs may progressively grow worse over the years and then one day they begin to wheeze a little more than usual and wind up with advancing shortness of breath.  Once this becomes significant and finally enters their consciousness, only then will the thought of seeking medical help actually come to mind.


DIAGNOSTIC OPTIONS
Oftentimes, an exam from the pulmonologist starts with the CAT scans of the chest. The firefighters are being tracked for pulmonary nodules. They're referred to as sub-centimeter nodules, which are so small that you can't read it. "You don't really see them on a plain X-ray, chest X-rays, PA and lateral. A lot of these first responders already come to me with CAT scans from the past and have been followed by World Trade Center program and the FDNY doctors that are also pulmonary doctors"- states Dr. Schulster.

In a pulmonologist's tool kit exists certain standard pulmonary function examss- including the SPIROMETRY [2].  This test estimates the narrowing of your bronchial tubes by checking how much air you can exhale after a deep breath and how fast you can breathe out [5].   This allows us to  see the best way of determining the lung function in numbers, more or less, is a complete pulmonary function test.  Next is the METHACHOLINE CHALLENGE [3] - also known as an asthma trigger that, when inhaled, will cause mild constriction of your airways.  If you react to the methacholine, you likely have asthma. This test may be used even if your initial lung function test is normal. [5]   Another test used is THE COLD AIR CHALLENGE [4]. The  patients generally come with having had those in the past and most are positive for asthma. In the asthmatics. 

See original article published 7/2019 @ The Journal of Modern Healing



 

 Disclaimer & Copyright Notice: The materials provided on this website are copyrighted and the intellectual property of the publishers/producers ( the NY Cancer Resource Alliance / IntermediaWorx inc). It is provided to you solely for your own personal, non-commercial use and not for purposes of resale, distribution, public display or performance, or any other uses by you in any form or manner whatsoever. Unless otherwise indicated on this Internet web site, you may display, download, archive, and print a single copy of any information on this Internet web site, or otherwise distributed from us for such personal, non-commercial use. Also, certain content may be licensed from third-parties. The licenses for some of this Content may contain additional terms. When such Content licenses contain additional terms, we will make these terms available to you on those pages, in the Terms of Use or in the Additional Information section of our Site (which his incorporated herein by reference).The publishers/producers of this website and the contents of this website such as videos, graphics, text, and other materials published are for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. For any questions you may have regarding a medical condition, please always seek the advice of your physician or a qualified health provider. Do not postpone or disregard any professional medical advice over something you may have seen or read on this website. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. This website does not support, endorse or recommend any specific products, tests, physicians, procedures, treatment opinions or other information that may be mentioned on this site. Referencing any content or information seen or published in this website or shared by other visitors of this website is solely at your own risk. The publishers/producers of this Internet web site reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to modify, disable access to, or discontinue, temporarily or permanently, all or any part of this Internet web site or any information contained thereon without liability or notice to you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday, February 16, 2020

45th Anniversary of the 1975 NY Telephone Exchange Fire

Red Star of Death
By Danny Noonan- retired FDNY Firefighter and former Fire Technology Instructor
Miramar College, San Diego, Calif.




The gravity of the situation hit me when I and five other FDNY firefighters arrived in our apparatus, slightly after midnight, in front of the New York Telephone Exchange Building on 2nd Avenue and East 13th Street in Manhattan. We descended to the sub cellar where lobby display panels indicated the fire was located. I was unaware at the time that 694 additional firefighters over the next 17 hours would follow our lead. I was 26 and had been a firefighter for two years.

Following 9/11, many consider the fire at The New York Telephone Company the second most deadly and costliest in the history of the Fire Department, City of New York (FDNY). Internationally, first responders refer to the fire as The Red Star of Death because a red star was stamped on the medical folder of each firefighter.

Photo source: Wikipedia
The timing for the retelling of the story is prescient:  February 27, 2020 marks the 45th year of this horrible incident that caused loss of life, communication disruption and the unconscionable abandonment by the City of New York of its firefighters.

The New York Telephone Company Main Switching Center building was a virtual fortress. The structure, designed to be earthquake and riot proof, with windows constructed of heavy wire glass in reinforced steel frames that were mounted with ¼ inch Lexan--- a bullet-resistant plastic. At the time of the fire, all windows at street level and on the second floor were covered with heavy metal cages to protect from vandals.

Constructed in 1925, the art deco, 11 story structure, located at 204 Second Avenue, served as the main switching center for the Lower East Side and downtown Manhattan.  It served a 300 square- block area and was equipped to handle 10,000’s of calls an hour.  Its customers included major business, six hospitals, nine housing projects, three universities - including NYU, 11 secondary schools, several NYPD police precincts, all units in the FDNY’s First Division and 190,000 residential phones.

The fire in the sub cellar grew to where there were 300 firefighters operating at one time, eventually as more alarms were transmitted, that figure expanded to 699 firefighters. We began the deep decent into the basement of the building.  The halls were long and tiled: an intricate labyrinthine maze, with several steel doors in several locations.  Smoke had gathered at the top of the corridors, creating a dim mist that caused the fluorescent lights to give off an eerie glow fading into blackness.  The constant ringing of the fire Klaxons - identical to a submarine dive alarm - added to the surreal environment.  The smoke was so thick that everyone used a lifeline (search rope) to enter and exit the building.

To gain access to the cable vaults firefighters descended a steep steel ladder to a passageway that led to series of three five – foot ladders.  This led deep into the underbelly of the sub-cellar cable vaults.  There was no vertical ventilation and no apparent means of secondary egress. The basement vault contained a maze of cables. The PVC coating on the thousands of copper cables were burning inside the pipe risers that led to the upper floors of the building. Visibility inside the cable vault was zero.  Adding to those harsh conditions was the melting polyethylene from the cables that was sticking to the firefighters boots, making our search even more taxing

The building was eventually engulfed in 10 million square feet of toxic smoke.  FDNY firefighters were exposed to thousands of pounds of burning polyvinyl chloride (PVC), hydrogen chloride, vinyl chloride monomer, and chlorinated dioxins.  The chlorinated dioxins are the most potent cancer carcinogens known to man.

The wind driven toxic smoke engulfed the whole neighborhood. At midday, motorists on the FDR drive seven blocks away – had to turn on their headlights to drive through the thick clouds of black smoke. Patients at the adjacent New York Eye and Ear Hospital were removed by stretches and wheelchairs to ambulances where they were evacuated to other hospitals. The Red Cross set up shelter for evacuees at local YMCA’s

The following transmission came from George Meade, WINS radio reporter, from a helicopter at 1,200 feet, at 08:20 , “It’s unbelievable. It’s like a movie.  It’s the fire in the phone company down there.  It’s a very smoky fire. The smoke extends all the way to Queens.”  The Mayor made a brief appearance at the height of the fire.  After taking a breath of the acrid smoke, he quickly returned to his limo and left the scene.

The firefighters depleted nearly 2,000 air cylinders for their self contained breathing apparatus (SCBA).  Firefighters who lost consciousness were rushed to Bellevue Hospital emergency room. Phones in Lower Manhattan went silent. The 911 emergency systems also were silent.  The Department was operating on its emergency back-up communication system.  From the initial alarm at midnight until late afternoon the following day it was a total of 17 hours before FDNY commanders announced that the fire was now “Under Control”.

At this fire 250,000 pounds of PVC insulation bound to One Billion feet of cable that would melt into hundreds of tons of smoldering toxic chemicals; bent structural steel, spoiled concrete and sent hundreds of citizens from the community to hospital emergency rooms. PVC emits hydrogen chloride gas when it comes in contact with moisture - such as a throat - it turns into hydrochloric acid. The acid damages tissue and the carcinogenic chemicals initiate and/or promote cancer.

Consequently: for weeks, there were 8,500 businesses and thousands of professional people without phone service, in a pre e-mail era, who were unable to communicate with customers, clients and their supplies.  The destruction led to catastrophic economic impact that was felt nationally and also had many global implications.

As time passed the firefighters from the “Phone Fire” were dying off –as young men.  The word was spreading through the firehouses that scores of firefighters had been diagnosed with cancer or lung disease – all of whom were responders to the fire.  We the “Phone Company Firefighters” were ironically sounding the alarm to the City and the Departments Hierarchy – with no response!

I started writing and calling the FDNY Bureau of Health Services.  How could they be unaware?  Were they not informed of Dr. Deborah Wallace, Ph-D, an expert in environmental health, in her book, “Into the Mouth of the Dragon - Fires in the age of Plastics” She devoted a chapter to the Phone Fire, she states, and “Virtually every firefighter who responded to the phone fire’s first two alarms has cancer”. She said there is no doubt that PVC and the Telephone Co. fire caused a cancer cluster.

Were they ignorant of the Bill Moyers, PBS special, ‘Trade Secrets” in which investigative journalists conducted an in-depth study of the manufacture of PVC. Once again, the investigation revealed that manufactures of PVC knew as early as the 1960s that PVC caused cancer and other illnesses—their workers were dying from exposure.   Thirty-one executives of an Italian company were actually indicted and tried for manslaughter because they chose to ignore the overwhelming life-and-death scientific data in favor of the bottom line. Now it appeared that the City of New York was indifferent to the plight of hundreds of its firefighters.

The City’s response in every instance was complete silence.  They ignored us and did not acknowledge our written or verbal pleas in any way. My written and verbal plea to mail cancer warning letters to Telephone Co. responders was not implemented – my thought: ‘Early Detection is the Best Cure!’  There was no post incident analysis to identify cancer clusters and subsequent measures that may be needed – just a Red Star stamped on our folder.

AT&T who was in the midst of a antitrust lawsuit with the Justice Department, on the breakup of the Bell System, marshaled 5,000 employees from across the country (mostly members of the Communication Workers of America - CWA) to begin reconstruction of what was the New York Telephone Building.  AT&T workers along with employees from Western Electric and Bell Labs (Now Nokia Bell Labs) their Herculean task included: Removing hundreds of thousands of pounds of smoldering PVC wiring, Replacing 1.2 Billion feet of wire, Replacing 16 Million switches, Replace 18,000 vented or melted pane’s of glass, Remove 12,000,000 lbs of burnt out debris.

One can connect the dots and assume communication workers cancer rates are as high as the FDNY Firefighters.

There is legislation pending in New York State.  Assembly Bill 4879 and Senate Bill 4920 relate to the time period for filing a toxic tort claim. This could help the firefighters and other victims of the incident including communications workers and others living and working near the Phone Company Fire.

The firefighters unions went ballistic when the “Phone Company Firefighters" were excluded from the New York State Cancer Presumptive Act of 1986 –

The failure of the system to adequately monitor and treat the Phone Company Firefighters is the basis for the FDNY World Trade Center monitoring program.  There was no epidemiology study conducted on the “Phone Company Firefighters” nor the communication workers and residents.  The cancer’s suffered by the phone fire responders is akin to those cancers now prevalent in 9/11 responders.

Located at Fire Department Headquarters, in Brooklyn, is the department’s Wall of Honor, a 40-foot long bronze memorial, with eternal torches burning at each end, is where the New York City Fire Department honors those who have made the supreme sacrifice.

Since 1865, 1,147 firefighter’s names, companies and date of death have been inscribed on individual gold tags. There is an adjoining 9/11 Wall of Honor that lists the 214 members who have died post 9/11 as result of developing cancers and other illnesses subsequent to working at Ground Zero. Yet, firefighters who lost their lives as a direct result of the New York Telephone fire ---“The Phone Fire” --- are not listed.  For they did not die at the scene of the toxic inferno; they had expired only after years, even decades, of suffering from varieties of cancer and respiratory disease.  Yet, paradoxically, they received no department mention of any kind; neither a memorial nor a plaque.

Of the hundreds of deaths, in my opinion, that are a result of the toxic terror that was reined on the 699 fearless firefighters – they are no less noble than 9/11 or any other Line of Duty deaths.

On November 17, 2019, The New York Times published “A Town 'Afraid to Breathe': a Chemical Fire in France Deepens Mistrust". The people of Rouen, France are fearful of the future consequences of a chemical fire in their city; perhaps, they can look to the FDNY Firefighters of the New York Telephone Fire for their answer. Assuredly, the solution is not a stamp of a Red Star!

In the spirit of 9/11, where we proclaimed to “Never Forget” we should encourage our elected officials to implement the necessary legislation to empower first responders, past, present and future with the means to seek recourse and advocate for a safer environment. Together, we must always remember those responders who have been diagnosed with cancer and other aliments resulting from their toxic exposure and “Never Forget” their unending contribution to our communities.

End
..................................................................................................................................................................
EPILOGUE
45 years later, the first responders' community including the remaining survivors of the 1975 NY Tel Exchange Fire recognizes this to be one of the most significant disasters in firefighting history next only to 9/11.  The many health impacts from this historical event also resulted in countless safety references from its many occupational hazards as well as prevention protocols and protective innovations.

The NY Cancer Resource Alliance (NYCRA) expresses eternal appreciation to Ret. Ff. Dan Noonan for his contribution and sacrifice to the City of New York and his generosity in the publishing of this report about the 1975 NY Telephone Exchange Fire.  Mr. Noonan was assigned to Ladder Company 3 on East 13th street where only two years into the fire service, he experienced one of the most historical and devastating fires in the history of NYC Fire Department. He has been an advocate for those firefighters who responded to the Telephone Company Fire.  

As one of the remaining survivors of this fire, Mr. Noonan retired from the department in the early '80's and pursued a career promoting fire safety education in the west coast.  Following the Sept.11th attacks, Mr. Noonan flew back to NY to volunteer at Ground Zero and assist his brethren on "the pile".   Now a permanent New York Resident, Mr. Noonan, a former Volunteer Tour Guide at the 9/11 Tribute Center and who was part of the New York City Uniform Firefighters Association  (NYCUFA) Congressional Lobbying Team for the passage of the Zadroga Act - 9/11 Heath Care.  Dan Noonan enjoys his retirement while volunteering his presence in the community as a speaker for cancer prevention and early detection and is one of the latest advocates and awareness ambassadors of NYCRA's First Responders Cancer Resource and the "Get Checked Now!" program.

.................................................................................................................................................................
FROM OUR COMMUNITY

CHRISTOPHER CONNER - President & CEO  FACE’s – 
(Firefighters Against Cancer & Exposures)  www.facingtogether.com 
Active Firefighter / Paramedic at Bedford (TX) Fire Department
"As a current firefighter with almost 17 years of service, I have seen brothers and sisters battle cancer more frequently than I could have ever imagined.  Unfortunately, some of those cases  are more personal and create a greater sense to act.    This film “THE FIRE STILL BURNS” provides a great look at how we began recognizing  firefighters’ illnesses and cancer, but also discovers that these issues were not isolated to 9/11.   Firefighters have performed at the highest standards to protect life and property long before  there was ever a thought about exposures...  They risk  their lives for people they do not know because of their passion to help others.  The general public has no idea  of the true dangers we face while doing a job we love." 



DEBI CAVOLO - president | Breast Cancer Comfort Foundation
http://www.breastcancercomfort.org/
"As a sister of an FDNY hero who gave his everything at every fire, I can say that this was an amazing piece of history.  This film shows that although we have looked at 9/11 as the centerpiece for firefighter’s illnesses, it started many years earlier.  We all know that firefighters are heroes but this short film put into perspective the hidden dangers that are beyond the fire. We learned after 9/11 that the fumes and the burning embers were dangerous to inhale BUT how many other buildings have these brave people gone into that were just as bad.  I have alerted my team at Breast Cancer ComfortFoundation that this film (and story) will go on our site.  We will remind everyone that cancer has heroes in every corner." 


SAL BANCHITTA - Ret. Ff. FDNY  (Engine 316 /49 Battalion)
Cancer Patient Support - www.CousinSal.org
"There is no such thing as a RETIRED FIREFIGHTER. The spirit to respond to a call for help stays with all of us until our last day. We are 'built' to stand watch for any threats to our community and be at the ready to do what needs to be done to restore safety and normalcy to the lives of our neighbors. Without hesitation, seeing our city in peril is an instant call to help and sacrifice everything all over again. This was Dan Noonan THEN... and NOW!  He spoke powerfully about the sacrifice of all the responders of the 1975 Tel Fire- and his writing and the film helps keep those lessons fresh in all of us.  Dan is still ON THE JOB and on watch - the kind that looks out for the health and safety of all brothers and sisters through awareness."


DR. ROBERT L. BARD -  Editor: First Responders Cancer Resource News
Advanced Cancer Imaging & Diagnostics - www.CancerScan.com
"Since the start of my career (including my years in the military), I have met countless rescue personnel who have put themselves at harms way for the noble cause of helping others- and they do this without hesitation or regret.  Plain and simply, firefighting is a dirty and dangerous job- and one with tremendous risks.  I applaud Dan for continuing to remind us all of the 'other fire burning' which is the constant battle against illness and cancers. His depiction of an historical disaster gives loving homage to the many who lost their lives in this and all other fires- but it also resonates an inspiring lesson about prevention and safety concerns throughout the global fire rescue service community."


GREG OLIVA​ - Community Development Manager at 
Movember Foundation (men's health group)  https://us.movember.com/
"The first responders community has always been near and dear to us at Movember.  Historically, they have always been our first and last line of defense without fail and without question.  Learning about the 1975 NY Telephone Exchange Fire was so heart wrenching and devastating.  It truly aligned cancer matters with occupational hazards that members of the fire service face- and this story fully prompts the need for more safety protocols for our rescuers and more conversations around how to support their health.  We owe a tremendous debt to all fire rescue service personnel and the best way to honor them is to keep them healthy and safe!"


DR. JESSE A. STOFF - Medical Director/ Cancer Specialist
at Integrative Medicine of NY (www.IMofNY.com)
"Thank you, Dan Noonan for your courage, your spirit and your commitment to fire rescue.  Your undying work to bring awareness about the fire and cancer risks is so important to the current sufferers/survivors.  But it is even more valuable to the future of all fire departments because as time goes on, more hazards continue to develop from fires and we need to thwart this with continued research for prevention, early detection and safety equipment.  I loved your writing and seeing you on the video interview adds impact to the message you bring us all."



.................................................................................................................................................................

Additional articles available:



Disclaimer & Copyright Notice: The materials provided on this website are copyrighted and the intellectual property of the publishers/producers (The NY Cancer Resource Alliance/IntermediaWorx inc. and Bard Diagnostic Research & Educational Programs). It is provided publicly strictly for informational purposes within non-commercial use and not for purposes of resale, distribution, public display or performance. Unless otherwise indicated on this web based page, sharing, re-posting, re-publishing of this work is strictly prohibited without due permission from the publishers.  Also, certain content may be licensed from third-parties. The licenses for some of this Content may contain additional terms. When such Content licenses contain additional terms, we will make these terms available to you on those pages (which his incorporated herein by reference).The publishers/producers of this site and its contents such as videos, graphics, text, and other materials published are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. For any questions you may have regarding a medical condition, please always seek the advice of your physician or a qualified health provider. Do not postpone or disregard any professional medical advice over something you may have seen or read on this website. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 9-1-1 immediately.  This website does not support, endorse or recommend any specific products, tests, physicians, procedures, treatment opinions or other information that may be mentioned on this site. Referencing any content or information seen or published in this website or shared by other visitors of this website is solely at your own risk. The publishers/producers of this Internet web site reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to modify, disable access to, or discontinue, temporarily or permanently, all or any part of this Internet web site or any information contained thereon without liability or notice to you.








Friday, December 13, 2019

HAZMAT BRINGS CANCER PREVENTION IDEAS TO LIGHT

From a NYCRA interview with Darryl Vandermark, Firefighter and (Ret.) HAZMAT Chief

Edited by: First Responders Cancer/Health Resource Group & Awarenessforacure.org editorial team

Historically, 9/11 is the single most referenced incident for every firefighter and first responder in the world. It was a tragedy and a major impact to the Emergency services. As a Fire Instructor, I teach my students about exposure and that every material is potentially toxic. Some things being more lethal than others, depending on how your body reacts to it, it’s all in the amount of the dose. 

In HAZMAT, we have many ways to measure the different types of substances that can identify if someone could or has been grossly contaminated. One of the many ways that we can measure a potential exposure is in (PPM) parts per million. (PPM) Parts per million, is the measure of concentration of a toxin in an environment that can be hazardous or immediately dangerous to life & health (IDLH). Any fire or hazmat personnel can measure this with various meters and/or instruments. Therefore, identifying possible routes of exposure to these hazards such in absorption, inhalation, and/or ingestion. One of the most heart wrenching things teaching firefighters or working with firefighter’s day in and out is traditionally, the fire service has always separated HAZMAT from FIREFIGHTING. But TRUTH be told many Firefighters & First Responders are exposed to hazardous substances and don’t know that it’s happening chronically in their everyday work. 

I often find myself, the "hazmat guy", witnessing recognizable symptoms of gross contamination on the fireground. After 20 minutes my brothers and I come out of a fire exhausted, sweating, red faced, swollen skin, and hearts pounding taking a moment only to get a “new” air bottle and preparing to go back to work again. Albeit, showing signs and symptoms we continue to work until the job is done. unfortunately, by Firefighters & First Responders ignoring the acute signs and symptoms on a daily basis, chronically it manifests itself into major health risks causing many types cancers and respiratory conditions.

9/11- A HAZMAT INCIDENT!
The staggering rate of cancer cases showed undisputed evidence aligning 9/11 as a HAZMAT INCIDENT and not just a building collapse or a building fire. 9/11 exposure reports included prostate cancers, lung cancers, and all breathing issues from airborne particulates including toxins attacking the lungs. Others have throat issues from the toxins burning the throat "barrette’s esophagus: L-image insert". It was a hazardous material incident proven by the presence of environmental companies and hazmat units from the entire tri-state who responded to manage the problem.

For all of these reasons first responders exposed to the highest health risks are often the ones to neglect their own health and safety. Awareness and education programs have recently stepped up to address this issue. Many similarities started to take shape as stated in the beginning of this article due to 9/11. As one major example, most responders from ground zero will never forget the unique inexplicable smell and the feeling like not getting enough air in your lungs. These conclusions began after 9/11, namely that ALL FIRES are HAZMAT INCIDENTS as they all emit hazardous concentrations of lethal toxins. All the coughing and spitting came from the body's mucous membranes working in overdrive. This is the body engaging the volume of toxins and trying to rid them from the body in an acute manor. First responders were not detoxifying from the chronic exposures to these toxins. There is a false sense of protection when firefighters don their “SCBA” respirator to protect from the acute effects of toxins. It only leads them to not realize the other means of their exposure that leads to chronic sickness. “We live to fight another day” until the manifestation of these toxins as various cancers and other health issues arise.

Responders accumulated so many types of chemicals and toxic compounds through every intake port of their body, such as the skin, eyes, hair, and breathing passages. Depending on the individual’s physiology and immune system, these foreign poisons did manage to penetrate and have different levels of short- or long-term damage in the future. It is from this that more and more Firefighters & First Responders are now contracting cancers (including time-released issues) from the chronic exposures to atomized compounds at high temperatures like volatile organic compounds (VOC) which are found at ALL FIRES not just HAZMAT INCIDENTS. 


BRIDGING THE GAP OF HAZMAT & FIREFIGHTING
No matter how many years it takes, they have to understand the hazardous materials in firefighting. I have spent 30 years in the fire service as a Firefighter as well as a Hazardous Materials Specialist and only in the past few years I have seen more BRIDGING the gaps between FIREFIGHTING and HAZMAT. When I started my career, you couldn’t get a classroom to stay awake during a hazardous materials training course. Heck! 30 years ago, the extent of understanding fire was the “fire triangle” students were taught if Heat, Fuel, and Oxygen was present there was “FIRE” that was the extent of the chemistry. And for HAZMAT, “if you could hide the scene behind your thumb” you were good!
With one major tragic incident, the fire service has learned firefighting is all about HAZMAT. Not only how it effects the public but much more about how it affects us. Only in the past 25 years our protective gear has advanced us into firefighting deeper into burning buildings, protecting us from heat far more than the orange rubber gloves and raincoats of the past. Respirators keep evolving, more durable and lighter than the past. Bunker-pants, turn-out coats, gloves, and hoods capable of withstanding temperatures that makes a firefighter able to get to victims deep into buildings and to extinguish fires faster. Although these advances in equipment & protective gear are great in firefighting they do not protect against exposure through absorption and inhalation. We advanced so much we forgot about the HAZMAT!

According to USFA (US Fire Administration) and FEMA, Firefighters face substantial risks of exposure to carcinogens and other toxins. These exposure risks result most often from dermal absorption during a fire or inhalation of off-gassing particles (volatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) from contaminated bunker gear during removal- whereby devising an effective health intervention can greatly reduce risks from exposure to carcinogens and other toxins.

The key to reducing health concerns by exposure is stringent decontamination practices, baseline Pre & Post (medical protocols), and strong educational programs.


EXTRA:

"The Fire Still Burns"- Episode 1 shares the best reason why all rescuers on the job should 'wear the mask!" This mini-series of interviews brings surviving first responders from historical events.  They share and describe their firsthand experiences and express their thoughts about safety, their health and  concerns about all first responders.  This episode highlights GARY STEMM's experiences at the 1975 NY Tel Exchange Fire, a disastrous event where 680+ responders perished from the largest fires in NYC history which affected most of the responders lives due to the toxic nature of this deadly fire.



CONTRIBUTING WRITER
DARRYL VANDERMARK is an active Fire Instructor at the Orange County Department of Emergency Services - Division of Fire with a strong background in education as a graduate of New York State college (SUNY)  Associate in Fire Science and an Educator at the New York State Academy of Fire Science, National Fire Academy, and US Department of Homeland Security . He also maintains a private profession as an Environmental Health & Safety Specialist and Instructor for ERTT (Emergency Response & Technical Training Services), supporting all response and rescue units and environmental remediation services.  He is a Retired Deputy Fire Coordinator (Chief) of the Orange County, New York Department of Emergency Services HAZ-MAT/WMD Response Team with over 30 years of Fire Service.  He is recently appointed as a health awareness ambassador of the NY CANCER RESOURCE ALLIANCE “Get Checked Now!” program for Orange County where he supports cancer prevention through public presentations and writing articles for the First Responders Health Resource.




This article is sponsored by: ERTT.org Emergency Response & Technical Training Svcs.



References:
1)What is Barrett's Esophagus? https://www.asge.org/home/for-patients/patient-information/understanding-barrett-39-s-esophagus
2)Firefighter decon challenges: knowledge versus practice /Posted: Feb. 7, 2019: https://www.usfa.fema.gov/current_events/020719.html


Disclaimer & Copyright Notice: The materials provided on this website are copyrighted and the intellectual property of the publishers/producers (The NY Cancer Resource Alliance/IntermediaWorx inc. and Bard Diagnostic Research & Educational Programs). It is provided publicly strictly for informational purposes within non-commercial use and not for purposes of resale, distribution, public display or performance. Unless otherwise indicated on this web based page, sharing, re-posting, re-publishing of this work is strictly prohibited without due permission from the publishers.  Also, certain content may be licensed from third-parties. The licenses for some of this Content may contain additional terms. When such Content licenses contain additional terms, we will make these terms available to you on those pages (which his incorporated herein by reference).The publishers/producers of this site and its contents such as videos, graphics, text, and other materials published are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. For any questions you may have regarding a medical condition, please always seek the advice of your physician or a qualified health provider. Do not postpone or disregard any professional medical advice over something you may have seen or read on this website. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 9-1-1 immediately.  This website does not support, endorse or recommend any specific products, tests, physicians, procedures, treatment opinions or other information that may be mentioned on this site. Referencing any content or information seen or published in this website or shared by other visitors of this website is solely at your own risk. The publishers/producers of this Internet web site reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to modify, disable access to, or discontinue, temporarily or permanently, all or any part of this Internet web site or any information contained thereon without liability or notice to you.